Urine and boiling water used to target ex-Comanchero, court hears
Advertisement

Urine and boiling water used to target ex-Comanchero, court hears

A former-Canberra bikie had boiling water mixed with urine poured under his cell door after he quit gang life, he claims.

The ACT Magistrates Court heard on Friday that Alexander Victor Miller, 28, had since been placed in segregation at the Alexander Maconochie Centre for his own protection.

However, the police claim Miller had actually been moved after he threatened another inmate.

Mr Miller, of Theodore, has been locked up since his June arrest on charges of possessing a prohibited firearm, possessing ammunition, and possessing a drug of dependence.

He has pleaded not guilty.

Advertisement

He made his third bail application before Magistrate Beth Campbell on Friday.

Canberra Comanchero Alexander Victor Miller has been charged with several offences.

Canberra Comanchero Alexander Victor Miller has been charged with several offences.Credit:Facebook

The court heard the ACT chapter of the Comanchero Outlaw Motorcycle Gang split into two factions earlier this year.

Loading

The split sparked tit-for-tat violence between the factions, including a drive-by shooting and arson in Page and the shooting of a gang associate in Chifley, both in March.

Mr Miller was arrested after police saw him drive his mother's car past the home of rival faction leader, Peter Zdravkovic on June 5.

Police allegedly found a sawn-off .38 rifle, ammunition, drugs, gloves, a black balaclava, cash, and other items in the car.

A sawn-off rifle police allegedly seized from Alexander Victor Miller in June.

A sawn-off rifle police allegedly seized from Alexander Victor Miller in June.Credit:ACT Policing

Mr Zdravkovic was wounded in a targeted shooting and arson only weeks later.

An officer told the court on Friday that police believed Miller had either been on a reconnaissance mission or aborted shooting attempt before he had been arrested.

Mr Miller has previously made two failed bail applications in the Magistrates Court, meaning he must show a change of circumstances.

His ACT Legal Aid defence lawyer, Hugh Jorgensen, argued Mr Miller’s circumstances had changed as he handed back his colours, effectively quitting his membership of the Comanchero.

Loading

The court heard, when news of his resignation had circulated, a mix of boiling water and urine had been thrown under his cell door, forcing jail authorities to shift him to 24 hour lockdown for his own safety.

However, police witness, Senior Constable Dale Ohlmus, attached to ACT Policing's anti-bikie unit Taskforce Nemesis, told the court he had received no confirmation Miller had actually quit the gang.

Senior Constable Ohlmus said Mr Miller may have been placed in segregation after jail staff heard him threaten another prisoner, calling the man a "dog" and saying he knew his family.

Mr Miller's mother also gave evidence, telling the court her son had left the gang and of his desire to turn his life around.

Loading

Prosecutor David Swan said Mr Miller faced significant drugs and weapons charges and argued he would pose an unacceptable risk to the community if released.

Mr Swan said the accused's record showed a number of breaches of court orders and the court could have no confidence he would abide by any bail conditions.

Mr Jorgensen said strict bail conditions and a surety could mitigate any concerns.

Ms Campbell refused the application, saying she could not make a decision based solely on the hearsay evidence put before the court.

Ammunition, which police allegedly seized from Alexander Victor Miller on Tuesday night.

Ammunition, which police allegedly seized from Alexander Victor Miller on Tuesday night.Credit:ACT Policing

Ms Campbell said she could not tell if Miller had actually severed his links to the Comanchero gang, or if it had been merely a "severance of convenience".

She noted that no ordinary citizen drives a car while armed with illegal firearms and other criminal accoutrements in an area where gang activity and gang warfare had been taking place.

The magistrate said, based on his past conduct, she had no confidence he would abide by any bail conditions.