Popular Australian wedding magazine under fire for gay 'silence'
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Popular Australian wedding magazine under fire for gay 'silence'

One of Australia's most popular wedding publications, White, has been criticised by contributors who say the magazine refuses to feature same-sex couples but won't publicly admit it.

Text messages between the magazine's editor and a photographer reveal the publication isn't including gay weddings.

Separately advertisers, photographers, videographers and celebrants have turned to Facebook this week to share stories about their interactions with White.

Many say they've been ignored after they've submitted same-sex content.

Photographer Lara Hotz noticed White didn't make any reference to gay couples during 2017's postal survey when 62 per cent of respondents supported changing the law to legalise same-sex marriage.

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Ms Hotz, whose images have run on the magazine's cover, reached out in August and November 2017 to ask if White would feature non-heterosexual couples.

She didn't receive a clear response despite her long-running relationship with the publication.

Ms Hotz followed up again with the editor and on Monday was told in a text message: "we aren't sharing Same Sex weddings at this point".

Ms Hotz, who is married to her female partner, says she feels discriminated against and undervalued by White's previously unspoken policy.

White magazine has been criticised by contributors who say it refuses to feature same-sex couple.

White magazine has been criticised by contributors who say it refuses to feature same-sex couple.Credit:AAP

"I imagine the majority of LGBTQI persons would be feeling hurt regarding not being represented equally or at all," the photographer said on Thursday.

Advertiser and photographer Ona Janzen said she was shocked to hear White was refusing to cover gay weddings.

"If I had known they don't support SSM I wouldn't have chosen to spend a good portion of my marketing funds with their magazine, on principle," she said on Thursday.

Ms Janzen said it "doesn't feel right" that a same-sex couple could subscribe to the magazine and be unaware it doesn't support marriage equality.

Ms Hotz insists she's not trying to force White to think like her. She simply wants the magazine to be open about its position so people are informed before buying the publication or advertising in it.

The photographer says most people in the industry support the right of same-sex couples to marry.

Advertiser and eco-wedding expert Sandra Henri was disappointed with White's "silence" on the day the postal survey result was announced in mid-November.

"The silence has continued since then," she said.

Ms Henri challenged White to have a trial period of diversity in the magazine.

White magazine was contacted but did not respond.

The publication on its website states it's "obsessed with changing the wedding culture to bring meaning back into marriage".

AAP