Voters furious over receiving more unsolicited texts from Clive Palmer
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Voters furious over receiving more unsolicited texts from Clive Palmer

Angry Queenslanders have continued to lash out at controversial businessman Clive Palmer on social media after another wave of unsolicited text messages were received on Saturday.

Some people who have received the texts claim they did not understand why they received the texts because they were either too young or simply could not vote in Australia.

However, the United Australia Party told Nine News it had not done anything wrong.

"The texts sent to residents were fully compliant under legislation approved by the Liberal and Labor governments," a party spokesperson said.

Texts from Clive Palmer have continued to be sent to Queenslanders on Saturday.

Texts from Clive Palmer have continued to be sent to Queenslanders on Saturday.

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"The United Australia Party has received strong levels of support as a result of these texts from Australians who are fed up with the raw deal they are getting under the Liberal/Labor duopoly."

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This comes after the former politician, who is staging a Canberra comeback at the next federal election, sent a series of election spam to voters on Friday.

The messages do not have an option to opt-out or unsubscribe.

Many questioned how Mr Palmer found their phone number and believed it was a breach of privacy while others have responded to the messages asking for them to stop and have received a message to say their texts were not delivered.

Voters also posted on Clive Palmer and United Australia Party's Facebook pages.

"How the hell have you got my phone number and WHY are you sending me unsolicited text messages, that I can neither block nor unsubscribe?" One woman wrote on Facebook.

"I am on the national do not call register, I am not a supporter of you nor have I ever been please remove me from your spam SMS drive," one man wrote.

The texts included policy changes calling on "affordable reliable power" in South Australia, fast trains to the CBD in Queensland, NSW and Victoria and a "zonal taxation policy" for lower taxes for regional Australia in north Queensland.

The Spam Act generally prohibits sending emails and text messages offering goods and services for sale unless the recipient has previously consented.

But registered political parties are allowed to send messages so long as they identify who authorised the message to be sent.

Complaints can be sent to the Australian Communications and Media Authority by forwarding them to report@submit.spam.acma.gov.au for emails or 0429 999 888 for SMS.

Jocelyn Garcia is a journalist at the Brisbane Times, covering breaking news.

Lydia Lynch is a reporter for the Brisbane Times

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