Premier Daniel Andrews says request for meeting with Tony Abbott met with silence
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Premier Daniel Andrews says request for meeting with Tony Abbott met with silence

Tension between the Prime Minister and Victorian Premier continues to simmer with Daniel Andrews accusing Tony Abbott of responding to a meeting request with "absolute silence" during a recent phone conversation.

Mr Andrews said he thought the Prime Minister had hung up on him.

The two leaders have been engaged in a terse public spat over the fate of the East West Link, after a letter from the Prime Minister urging Mr Andrews to build the road was leaked to the media before it had been sent to the Victorian government.

The Prime Minister was in Melbourne on Thursday but the two did not meet.

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PM Tony Abbott presents the first of the public tickets to the Gallipoli centenary to Cecilia Cornish.

PM Tony Abbott presents the first of the public tickets to the Gallipoli centenary to Cecilia Cornish. Credit:Joe Armao

Speaking on Thursday morning Mr Andrews revealed that last time they had spoken on the phone, over another matter, he had asked to catch up in person to discuss a range of issues including East West Link and federal funding.

"At the end of the phone was silence; I thought he had hung up at one point, but it was absolute silence," Mr Andrews said.

The Prime Minister's office disputed that was how the conversation went, saying Mr Abbott indicated he was happy to meet with the Premier as soon as practicable.

Mr Andrews again refused to bow to pressure from the federal government to break its promise to abandon the multibillion dollar road project.

"Mr Abbott has got form when it comes to breaking promises, he can bully, he can beg all he wants, but we were elected to get on with things," Mr Andrews said.

He said the letter was just political games from a Prime Minister and expressed his frustration that it had been given to the media before him.

"Tired old politics will achieve nothing."

The Prime Minister began his day in Horsham, where he reiterated his view that the Victorian government was risking Australia's international reputation by ripping up a contract for major infrastructure.

"I'm always happy to meet with the Premier, but at the moment, I have a very clear message for the Premier: don't tear up this contract. Don't go into the Parliament to abrogate people's rights," Mr Abbott said.

After his visit to Victoria's west, Mr Abbott had meetings and a picture opportunity to mark the first round of ballots for the public to attend the Gallipoli centenary.

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