Osmington police investigation will go on for months: Commissioner
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Osmington police investigation will go on for months: Commissioner

The police investigation into the murder-suicide at Osmington last week will go on for several more months, WA Police Commissioner Chris Dawson has revealed.

Police believe 61-year Peter Miles shot and killed his wife, daughter and four grandchildren before turning the gun on himself at their farming property east of Margaret River last Friday morning.

WA Police Commissioner Chris Dawson speaks at the press conference on the murder-suicide in Osmington last week. Mr Dawson revealed this week the investigation would likely take several months to complete.

WA Police Commissioner Chris Dawson speaks at the press conference on the murder-suicide in Osmington last week. Mr Dawson revealed this week the investigation would likely take several months to complete.Credit:James Brickwood

The bodies of Mr Miles and his wife Cynda, his daughter Katrina, and his four grandchildren Taye, Rylan, Ayre and Kayden Cockman were found on the 30-acre property by two police officers, who were called to the home early on Friday after a triple-zero call was made by a man from the property.

Three guns found at the farm were licensed to Mr Miles.

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On Thursday Mr Dawson told Gareth Parker on the Radio 6PR Mornings program that the homicide investigation was progressing.

"The investigation will go on for several months and we will prepare a report for the state coroner," he said.

"In terms of Osmington itself our forensic team ... have completed the forensic work that they've been undertaking since the event last Friday morning.

"They've now handed the property back to family connections and so we've physically left that particular scene."

Mr Dawson said police were still seeking information from the local community as the investigation moved forward.

He said police had already received "a lot of response back" from the public.

Asked if motive would form part of the inquiry, Mr Dawson said: "Yes because it is a homicide, a number of homicides, so motive always forms an element whenever you are investigating an unlawful killing."

Mr Dawson said the two officers who initially attended the scene were "doing really well" and that he had spoken to them personally several times.

"You cannot describe - and nor should I - the difficult role that they had to undertake," he said.

"They did a very very professional job. They just did a very difficult job and did it as best as they possibly can.

"You cannot train police officers or any first responders to a scale of that nature, but they are tremendous officers."

A fundraising campaign for the funerals of those who died has begun, as shocked friends pay tribute to the victims.

A GoFundMe page aims to raise $40,000 for the family to help with preparations for the funerals of Katrina and her children, who were well known within Margaret River's home-schooling community.

Phil is a Fairfax Media journalist based in Western Australia and covers court, crime and police