Snakes and boomerangs: Tidbinbilla nature reserve opens its gates

It's been 10 years since Tidbinbilla reopened its gates after the devastating 2003 Canberra bushfires.

While the scars of the firestorm remain, life is thriving once again in the reserve.

Six-year-old Bailey Harrington from Jerrabombera examines some aimal remains with ACT Parks and Conservation Service regional manager Pete Cotsell.  Photo:  Sitthixay Ditthavong

Six-year-old Bailey Harrington from Jerrabombera examines some aimal remains with ACT Parks and Conservation Service regional manager Pete Cotsell. Photo: Sitthixay Ditthavong

On Sunday, rangers invited Canberrans to "rediscover" Tidbinbilla for its annual open day, hosting live music, food stalls and guided tours, as the sanctuary continues recovery efforts for local wildlife.

Ian Walker at the ACT's environment directorate said the free event was about helping people reconnect with the bushland on their doorstep.

Norzinani M. Zin, Nor Afzan Jemburi, and three-year-old Auff Saufi with reptiles at the Tidbinbilla open day.  Photo: Sitthixay Ditthavong

Norzinani M. Zin, Nor Afzan Jemburi, and three-year-old Auff Saufi with reptiles at the Tidbinbilla open day. Photo: Sitthixay Ditthavong

Murrumbung rangers were on hand to teach visitors how to throw a boomerang, make bush tucker and try traditional weaving while snakes and lizards mingled with the crowd during a live reptile display.

Last month, Tidbinbilla's koala breeding program celebrated a milestone as Malu, whom rangers have deemed the "cutest koala" ever born at the sanctuary, left his enclosure to venture out into a protected section of the Eucalypt forest.

Xanthe Smith, 8, and Verity Smith, 10, from Waramanga, and Zahra Crouch, 10, from Banks get hands on with a black-headed python at the Tidbinbilla open day.  Photo: Sitthixay Ditthavong

Xanthe Smith, 8, and Verity Smith, 10, from Waramanga, and Zahra Crouch, 10, from Banks get hands on with a black-headed python at the Tidbinbilla open day. Photo: Sitthixay Ditthavong