OPINION

All the reasons Harry would actually make a top GG

Twitter is cross (of course it is) about the suggestion Palace officials considered sending Prince Harry to Australia to be Governor General, to diffuse the fabled "royal rift" and to stop attention to the True Future King and Queen leaching annoyingly towards the "rockstar" Sussexes.

But, despite the small detail that the Palace hasn't had the constitutional entitlement to pick the GG for decades, if we did have to endure another term of being indirect subjects to the people living in it then Harry would not be the worst man for the job.

Britain's Prince Harry would certainly shake up the office of the GG. Photo: Eddie Jim

Britain's Prince Harry would certainly shake up the office of the GG. Photo: Eddie Jim

There is plenty going for him as a candidate.

He is down with feminism

Sure we've had "quiet" activist (Dame) Quentin Bryce, with her penchant for fashion symbols in the colours of the Suffragettes, but, as we know, nothing much really changes for women until men decide something should change, so having a GG Harry-the-women's-rights fan couldn't be a bad thing.

Meghan Markle signalled in 2018 to a well-wisher that she was not the only feminist in Kensington Palace, her husband was one too. Harry confirmed it early this year during a visit to Tomorrow's Women, an NGO that supports vulnerable women with training, workshops and mental health programs, and initiatives to get them through domestic abuse and addiction.

"I'm a feminist," he told the women. Were he appointed GG, he may be the first one to have initiated a "group hug" with 15 women during one such event. The group's CEO, Angela Murphy, reported HRH Prince H confided to her his belief that: "It's really important that men are involved. It's true, you've got to be working together. There's no divide between men and women with regard to these issues."

He challenges 'tough' male leader stereotypes, discussing mental health

Harry has been happy to talk about his own, protracted mental health struggle after losing his mother, Princess Diana, when he was 12. He discusses the subject of mental health in a highly relatable and inclusive way (not speaking down to audiences, but participating in discussions about this vital community health issue).

He said in a 2017 interview that having "shut down all (his) emotions" after the death of Diana, he had experienced two years of "total chaos" in his late twenties as he attempted to come to grips with his loss, and found himself "on the verge of punching someone".

"I have probably been very close to a complete breakdown on numerous occasions when all sorts of grief and sort of lies and misconceptions and everything are coming to you from every angle," he told the London Telegraph. He discussed having seen a psychiatrist and that being "great".

"The experience I have had is that once you start talking about it, you realise that actually you're part of quite a big club.

"I can't encourage people enough to just have that conversation because you will be surprised firstly, how much support you get and secondly, how many people literally are longing for you to come out." He'd be setting a new benchmark for healthy, personal information sharing by a GG right there.

He is up with millennial life habits that may help save the planet

Especially since hooking up with health-conscious Meghan Markle, Harry is a known fan of a diet with less processed food, more plant-based food and, reportedly, little to no alcohol.

He has, according to reports, given up bacon and has also been snapped many times wearing a black Oura ring, a high tech gizmo that monitors REM sleep and calorie burn among other health indicators - so part of the generational change that would sweep through Yarralumla if the Sussexes did move in would be a high-profile emphasis on health and wellbeing from the top down.

Prince Harry on the verge of a mic drop during his closing speech at the Invictus Games in Sydney last year. Millennial public speaking styles, in spades. Photo: AP

Prince Harry on the verge of a mic drop during his closing speech at the Invictus Games in Sydney last year. Millennial public speaking styles, in spades. Photo: AP

His less uptight way of doing things, millennial style, generally would a blast of fresh air. When was the last time we saw our own head of state rolling around on the ground with little kids?

Former royal correspondent, Duncan Larcombe, who wrote Prince Harry, The Inside Story, describes Harry's style as so low on old-school artifice, he is "frighteningly honest."

"He really is the guy that most blokes would like to have a beer with and most women would like to have a beer with ..."

And ... it would be good for Australian fashion

Having the most Googled woman of 2018 living on our shores would no doubt boost the bottom line (and export earnings) for Australian fashion brands. The Duchess' every outfit was combed over forensically during her visit with Prince Harry last year, and more of the same global platforming of our many many excellent designers could only be a good thing.

Even after one, short visit, the impact of the Duchess being seen in Australian brands was reported by several to have helped a great deal.

SMH/The Age

This story All the reasons Harry would actually make a top Governor General first appeared on The Sydney Morning Herald.