Opinion

Economic coercion from abroad: how worried should Australia be?

By Adam Triggs
Updated July 1 2021 - 5:00pm, first published September 21 2020 - 6:30pm
China is a hugely important trading partner - but its coercive powers are not unlimited. Picture: Shutterstock

What next? Iron ore? China's restrictions on Australian beef, barley, wine and coal have led many to worry about the threat of economic coercion - countries using their economic clout to achieve geopolitical objectives. But the reality is more complex than people make out. International markets, domestic markets and Australia's policies and regulations play a critical role in thwarting attempts at coercion, and there's plenty more the government could be doing to stop it.

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