Research finds orange-bellied parrot wings change in captivity, could affect wild survival chances

Adam Holmes
January 28 2021 - 12:00pm
Wild orange-bellied parrots were found to have more pointed wings than their captive counterparts - a possible reason why survival rates are low when captive birds are released. Picture: Dr Dejan Stojanovic/ANU
Wild orange-bellied parrots were found to have more pointed wings than their captive counterparts - a possible reason why survival rates are low when captive birds are released. Picture: Dr Dejan Stojanovic/ANU

Research has found the wing shapes of captive orange-bellied parrots differ from their wild counterparts, suggesting a potential reason for the low survival rate upon release for the critically endangered migratory Tasmanian bird.

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Adam Holmes

Adam Holmes

Journalist at The Examiner and Advocate, Tasmania

From Adelaide to south-west Victoria, Bendigo to Tasmania, I've provided in-depth stories in politics, environmental affairs, issues facing disadvantaged communities, legal affairs and much more. Contact me at adam.holmes@examiner.com.au or on Twitter at @adamholmes010

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