Voice of Real Australia: Why wombats are rotting to death transcript

Updated November 18 2021 - 3:26am, first published 3:02am

Tom Melville 0:00 Hi, I'm Tom Melville, and welcome to voice of real Australia. Each episode we bring new people, places and perspectives from beyond the big cities. Coming across a wombat in the wild is a rare treat. They're usually pretty shy and only come out at night. But the cuddly furballs are in trouble has individuals throughout their range of being disfigured by a parasite mange. The skin becomes concrete and cracks. They get fly blown and walk around with open wounds. They lose their hearing and their eyesight. They rot to death, often dying from secondary infections, starvation, or from wandering blindly onto the road. One that seemed to be particularly vulnerable to mange an infestation of parasitic mites. Other animals usually just shake it off, but in wombats, it has a 100% kill rate if left untreated. Some local populations of wombats have nearly been wiped out by me. So what's being done to help them? Produce Laura Corrigan followed a group of volunteers in the Blue Mountains, we're trying to save the one bats.

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