State of the Environment highlights plight of species: bogong moth and gang-gang cockatoos provide insight into ACT demise

Alex Crowe
By Alex Crowe
Updated July 25 2022 - 2:39am, first published July 24 2022 - 8:00pm
ANU bogong moth researcher Dr Ben Keaney; gang-gang cockatoo; bogong moths caught in floodlights. Pictures: James Croucher, Sitthixay Ditthavong, Ben Keaney

When considering the species behind the widespread neglect made public this week in the State of the Environment report, it is hard to think of a more apt example of dramatic decline than that of the bogong moth.

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Alex Crowe

Alex Crowe

Science and Environment Reporter

Alex covers science and environment issues, with a focus on local Canberra stories. alex.crowe@austcommunitymedia.com.au

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