Robbie and Tracey Wallace are building a replica of Stonehenge on their property at Bywong, near the intersection of the Federal Highway and Macs Reef Road.

Robbie and Tracey Wallace are building a replica of Stonehenge on their property at Bywong, near the intersection of the Federal Highway and Macs Reef Road. Photo: Stuart Walmsley

IT SOUNDS like a scene straight out of the 1984 cult classic film This is Spinal Tap - Bywong property owners Robbie and Tracey Wallace have begun constructing a scaled down replica of Stonehenge on their property just off the Federal Highway outside Canberra.

While it might not be the same size as one of England's most famous tourist drawcards, it's certainly attracting plenty of attention from those driving past, promising to become a landmark of its own.

While mystery and countless theories still surround the original Wiltshire formation and the construction techniques used to lift the huge boulders, it's not too hard to see how the modern version got to be there. Mr Wallace said the inspiration came from some perfectly formed rocks he was removing from a paddock in a property at Hall.

He thought they looked just like the famous ones in Wiltshire - right down to the atmospheric moss.

The couple looked up some maps of the outcrop on the internet and set about creating Bywong's not-so prehistoric version of the famous formation. While they might not have had Druids at their disposal, they did have one clear advantage over other would-be stonehenge builders. As owners of an earth moving business they have access to the equipment that makes the construction a little easier.

Ms Wallace said the project was just a bit of fun - they were not great historians and there's certainly no human sacrifices planned in the stone circle.

''It's obviously not as big as the original Stonehenge but it will look pretty good when it's finished,'' Ms Wallace said.

This is not the first time the Wallaces have been a bit creative with the hill on the highway.

Last year after getting married on the property they mowed a giant love heart on the hill and renamed it ''Valentine Hill''.

Ms Wallace said they often received letters dropped into the mailbox thanking them for such a positive sentiment. However, he thinks the hill might have to be named again now that a replica of such a famous formation lies atop it.