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Sex in ACT? Anything goes

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Sex in ACT? Anything goes

Sex in ACT? Anything goes

CANBERRANS have some of the broadest sexual preferences in the country, a new survey has revealed.

Early results from the Great Australian Sex Census indicate Canberrans find all manner of professions ''sexy''.

Canberrans bucked the national trend of rating medical staff the sexiest profession, instead preferring a romp with those that work in the entertainment and sport sector (11.3 per cent).

The large number of universities in Canberra helped rank students as third-sexiest occupation (7.5per cent), equal with emergency services personnel.

In a coup for lab geeks, workers within the pharmaceutical and biotechnology fields are more likely to find love in the capital, polling 2.5 per cent - the highest of any jurisdiction in Australia.

Other standout areas for the ACT was support for gay marriage (65per cent).

Canberra men will be disappointed to learn they are the least endowed. But Australian Sex Party leader Fiona Patten defended the territory's manhood and put the figures down to integrity rather than deficiency.

''I think we have to say that Canberra men are more honest and don't exaggerate as much,'' Ms Patten said.

The survey, which claims to ask the questions the Australian Bureau of Statistics is too afraid to ask, aims to lift the doonas on the nation's sexuality.

But the joke factor belies a serious side, with Ms Patten saying the census contains important questions that are never asked or considered in Australia.

''It's actually useful to have this information when politicians look at policy reform around same-sex marriage, around sexual discrimination and sex education as it shows what people know or what people believe in.

''Technology and the anonymity of the net has really helped in getting more honest reactions from people on surveys like this.

''The last large-scale survey attempted like this was done by La Trobe University around 2000, but those results were done via a face-to-face interview and it's a lot harder to have people be honest with private information.

''While it can be fun, there is a serious side to the survey for policymakers and educators.''

To take part in the census, visit www.sexcensus.com.au, it closes on February1.

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