Pat Campbell

A selection of published work from The Canberra Times artist.

Latest commentary and opinion

Cochlear's silence on animal testing

A Cochlear ear device.

Sam de Brito 9:44 AM   One of Australia's great international success stories, Cochlear Australia, is testing a version of their famous "bionic ear" on 16 cats they have paid $400,000 to be intentionally deafened.

Karalee Katsambanis: parents should hang head in shame over obese kids

generic thumbnail, eating, food, diet, health

Karalee Katsambanis 9:34 AM   I'm not going to pretend that getting kids to eat healthy isn't hard work. But as a long-term investment, isn't it also worth it?

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Larry Graham: the challenge of revamping tax in the face of self-interest

Pepper Group employees are in the money.

Larry Graham 9:17 AM   Everyone wants to overhaul the taxation system in some way. The problem is that everyone also has self-interest that is a barrier to reform ever happening.

COMMENT

Bishop's end game: the untenable became unbearable, from A to Z

Paul Sheehan

Paul Sheehan 10:05 PM   The Bronwyn Bishop saga became the Tony Abbott saga. The Speaker's excesses became the political property of the prime minister. Her immovability became his failure.

Comments 201

Goodes is better than the booers, and so are we

Amanda Vanstone.

Amanda Vanstone 9:35 PM   It’s complicated, but one thing is clear: it is plainly ridiculous to paint Adam Goodes as the bad guy here.

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Strong leadership needed on carbon reduction policies

cameron clyne

Cameron Clyne 8:48 PM   Basic truths about our survival, and our managing risks relate to how well we manage diversification, innovation and constant adaptation – these are the keys to business and national prosperity.

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In the Herald: August 3, 1937

In the Herald dinkus

Harry Hollinsworth 12:00 AM   Two young Australian singers, Miss Viola Morris and Miss Victoria Anderson, amazed Londoners by growing beans in the garden of their Kensington cottage, the Herald reported on this day in 1937.

Failure to deal fairly with East Timor opening the door to China

Nick Xenophon dinkus Dinkus

Nick Xenophon 9:00 PM   East Timor is one of the world's youngest and poorest countries located just off our northwest coast.

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View from the Street: Bishop taken

Andrew P Street dinkus

Andrew P Street 7:50 PM   And who's fighting reality for no sensible reason today? Your news of the weekend, reduced to a snarky rant.

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Indigenous voices must be heard

Tim Dick.

Tim Dick 9:00 PM   For too long, Australia has been too quick to tell Indigenous people what to do, and too slow to listen.

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Victoria: the education state, or ghetto?

"Unless government adopts a different relationship to public schooling, the relationship of many children to learning will remain weak."

Richard Teese 12:15 AM   Dan Andrews needs to show that he cares about state schools.

Letters to the Editor

Bullies bred in-house

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6:55 PM   Bullying continues in the public service ("Public service bully bill heads for $80m", July 30, p1). Many public servants are greatly stressed by not having enough resources or time to do their jobs properly.

Editorial

Gold miner wants a second chance for Majors Creek

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The Canberra Times 5:44 PM   Unity Mining is asking for a second chance to modify a gold mine east of Canberra.

In the darker web

Highs: Silk Road by Eileen Ormsby is a fascinating expose of the "dark web".

Eileen Ormsby   It's no secret to those who know my work that I approve of aspects of the dark web. It allows ordinary people to surf the net without sharing information with prying corporate interests and nosy governments.

With every case, a little more of me dies

Charles Waterstreet dinkus

Charles Waterstreet   Last year, I was involved in a criminal case that caused nearly every fibre in my body to become inflamed.

How your workplace affects your weekend mood

Matt Wade dinkus Dinkus

Matt Wade   How are you enjoying the weekend? It turns out your answer to that question depends a lot on your workplace, not just how you spend your Saturdays and Sundays.

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Letters to the Editor

Florey rates rapacious

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I read with interest that Florey was identified as one of the more disadvantaged suburbs in the ACT.

Attacks on Adam Goodes are simple racism, and should be cause for national shame

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The Canberra Times   The vilification of one of our most important and successful Indigenous sportspeople should be cause for deep soul-searching within our community.

Truth also died in murder of ABC journalist

Alan Ramsey

Alan Ramsey   Australian ABC journalist Tony Joyce was shot in a police car in Zambia in 1979 and later died. Declassified files from the National Archives reveal that the federal government never sought justice for his murder.

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Get on board, get on the bus

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Waiting

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Michael Coulter   Driving to work is a tedious affair, but it has its compensations.

Gender pay gap is worse than you think

Jessica Irvine

Jessica Irvine   It has become popular to dismiss the gender pay gap as a "myth". But you know what they say about lies, damn lies and statistics.

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A test of who we are

<I>Illustration: Andrew Dyson</i>

Michael Gordon   Suddenly, perversely, Australian Rules Football is no longer a showcase for reconciliation. How did it come to this?

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Political hubris can't be swatted away

Peter Hartcher dinkus

Peter Hartcher   Tony Abbott thinks he is giving his party a lesson in loyalty. But it will come at a greater cost than a helicopter ride.

My vote for decency

Julian Cribb

Julian Cribb 11:45 PM   As I age, I notice that people around me tend to gravitate to one of two categories – those who have gone through life learning little and who become increasingly embittered, angry, cut-off and vengeful. And those who learn their whole life through, and become more tolerant, broad-minded, informed, wise, forgiving and generous in their estimate of their fellow human beings.

Trade deal to attack public-owned programs

Our future leaders will be forced to reckon with inequitable and unjust social changes brought about by the TPP, says Thomas Faunce.

Thomas Faunce 11:45 PM   In the balmy climes of Hawaii, negotiators from many Pacific rim countries including Australia, United States, Canada, Japan, South Korea, Chile, Peru New Zealand, Singapore and Brunei have been meeting to finalise the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement.

Abbott needs to listen to Baird - before the next choppergate

Sean Nicholls dinkus Dinkus

Sean Nicholls   A couple of important issues lie at the heart of the Bronwyn Bishop helicopter saga - and politicians' entitlements isn't the more critical one.

The myth of merit for women in leadership

Judith Ireland

Judith Ireland   When it comes to talk about the lack of women in positions of power and influence, the infamous m-word is never far away.

Comments 21

Why the ACT can't afford to be without an ICAC

Jack Waterford

Jack Waterford   Corruption is a cancer that slows the economy and distorts efficiency. It's time for an ICAC in the ACT.

Editorial

MH370 wing fragment discovery renews hope in the unlikely search

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The Canberra Times   Everything about the search for MH370 is extreme: the size of search area, the depth of the water being scanned – up to 5000 metres – and (frequently) the weather conditions. That's an unlikely scenario for success.

Letters to the Editor

Hunting wildlife for trophies an abhorrent business

Canberra Times Letters thumbnail

Anyone with even a modicum of concern for the future of the world's wildlife will feel both anguish and sadness at the recent killing of a well-known nature park lion in Zimbabwe.

Closure on coal will be a costly affair

The Isaac Plains coal mine in Bowen Basin, central Queensland, sold this week for $1.

Richard Denniss   Like mobile phones, you can now pick a coal mine up for $1. Literally $1. The Isaac Plains coal mine in Queensland's Bowen Basin changed hands this week for less than the cost of a cup of coffee.

The sad sorry saga of Adam Goodes

If Adam Goodes is forced out of the game, an entire nation will be diminished.

Norman Abjorensen   The hostility of AFL crowds towards Goodes makes it clear those who flaunt Indigenous colours are unwelcome in the white man's club.

Cecil’s death may not have been entirely in vain

Piper Hoppe, 10, from Minnesota, in the US, protests against the killing of Cecil, Zimbabwe's best-known lion.

Judith Woods   The hunter has become the hunted. The predator is now the quarry. Cecil the lion, a once-mighty symbol of the natural world, has been slain, and now it is his killer, Walter Palmer, who is on the run.

Cost of tobacco litigation serves as TPP warning

As well as inflicting  venue-banning and state-mandated disease porn on smokers,  federal governments have a growing addiction to tobacco revenue.

Kyla Tienhaara and Deborah Gleeson   On Tuesday, Fairfax Media economics writer Peter Martin made the startling revelation that the government's ongoing legal dispute with Philip Morris has already cost the country $50 million.

Should we give the homeless a home?

A homeless person in Canberra.

Michael Short 10:00 AM   Should we give homeless people, well, a home? Is this simple idea perhaps the best solution to homelessness?    

How to save our ABC from Abbott and Murdoch

ABC supporters are digging in to protect the broadcaster.

Ranald Macdonald 9:00 PM   If you value Aunty, then it's time to speak up and defend her.

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Rail will keep Canberra wages high and unemployment down

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Alex White   Building light rail will deliver a short-term boost of 3500 jobs from 2016-18, just when we need it, and will build a transformational piece of public infrastructure.

A peek at peak internet

Catherine Armitage

Catherine Armitage   Let's imagine the internet in 50 years. Everything will be instrumented, quantified, "smart" and networked.

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You must apologise for reading this

Annabel Crabb dinkus

Annabel Crabb   Some people under scrutiny should admit their misdeeds and move on while others have done nothing wrong.

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Cannabis trial could lead to exciting discovery

Jennifer Martin dinkus

Jennifer Martin   Medical professionals are left in a moral and ethical quandary when it feels like they aren't listening to terminally ill cancer patients who want to try cannabis to relieve symptoms.

What justice for Cecil the lion would actually look like

Protesters hold signs during a rally outside the River Bluff Dental clinic against the killing of a famous lion in Zimbabwe, in Bloomington, Minnesota July 29, 2015. Wildlife officials on Tuesday accused American hunter Walter Palmer of killing Cecil, one of the oldest and most famous lions in Zimbabwe, without a permit after paying $50,000 to two people who lured the beast to its death. As of Tuesday, Palmer had temporarily closed his office, River Bluff Dental, in Bloomington, Minnesota, amid wishes for his death and widespread criticism of his hunting on social media and under business reviews on Google and Yelp.  REUTERS/Eric Miller

Alyssa Rosenberg   Walter Palmer, the Minnesota dentist who was recently identified as the person who killed an iconic Zimbabwean lion, had a rotten week.

Abbott’s loyalty to Bishop invites calamity

Mark kenny dinkus

Mark Kenny   In a spectacular own goal, the Prime Minister's hand-picked Speaker is now his greatest liability.

In the Herald: July 31, 1982

In the Herald dinkus

Ellen Fitzgerald   The Australian Archives were in crisis and a soup kitchen was needed in Manly.

Head of state rumours exaggerated

Peter FitzSimons.

Peter FitzSimons   People have indulged me since I became chairman of the Australian Republican Movement.

Damage done by Bronwyn Bishop not just about money

Speaker Bronwyn Bishop has hit the headlines over her expense claims

Derek Rielly   It is the plumpest teat of all, so abundant and full with riches, you can spend an entire career on it, guzzling for all you're worth, and it doesn't even come close to withering.

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Highlights

Canberra Times letters to the editor

Canberra Times editorial

Jack Waterford

The latest opinin pieces from Canberra Times commentator.

David Pope

The latest cartoons from The Canberra Times editorial artist.

Pat Campbell

The latest cartoons from The Canberra Times artist.