Shake up at ACT Health: government announces new health bosses
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Shake up at ACT Health: government announces new health bosses

The coordinator of the Northern Territory government's response to the youth detention royal commission will head clinical delivery of health services in the ACT.

Janet Anderson was announced as chief executive of Health Services, which would oversee Canberra Hospital, on Monday morning.

New ACT Health director-general Michael De'Ath (left) with new Canberra Hospital and Health Services chief executive Janet Anderson at the opening of a new walk-in health centre in Gungahlin on Monday.

New ACT Health director-general Michael De'Ath (left) with new Canberra Hospital and Health Services chief executive Janet Anderson at the opening of a new walk-in health centre in Gungahlin on Monday.

Photo: Finbar O'Mallon

ACT Health interim director-general Michael De'Ath will become director general of ACT Health.

The government has appointed the new bosses less than a month before the organisation splits on October 1.

The organisation will split into ACT Health, which will oversee governance of Canberra's health services, and Health Services, which will oversee Canberra Hospital and the clinical delivery of services.

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The changes to ACT Health were announced shortly before an independent report from the Australian Council on Healthcare Standards saw Canberra Hospital at risk of losing its accreditation.

The report found systemic problems around the governance system of the hospital.

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Mr De'Ath replaces former director general Nicole Feely who quit suddenly in March this year.

An auditor general's report released in August found allegations of bullying against Ms Feely and a deputy director general were not properly managed.

The appointments come as the ACT government continues its recruitment for two deputy director-general roles in the new organisation.

Ms Anderson helped prepare the Northern Territory government's response to the Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory.

Ms Anderson said she saw similar issues and opportunities in the ACT as she did in the Northern Territory, but didn't want to approach the role with any pre-conceived views.

She said the reforms she led into child protection in the Northern Territory required government commitment, funding and follow ups by senior bureaucrats.

"I see the same sorts of issues, or the same opportunities I suppose, in the ACT," Ms Anderson said.

"The health work force in the ACT is second-to-none ... that's the perfect platform for the sort of improvements or achievements we would expect from a world class health system."

Her new role will also see her providing health care to Canberrans in detention.

She said while she couldn't comment on the existing system but said the healthcare of people in detention or in the ACT's care was important.

"My first and most important task is to listen to the staff," Ms Anderson said.

Health minister Meegan Fitzharris said Mr De'Ath, who headed ACT Health after Ms Feely's shock departure, had proven himself.

"I think [ACT Health] has a very bright future. Not all of the issues are going to be solved overnight," Ms Fitzharris said.

Mr De'Ath said the split gave him an opportunity to focus on the healthcare system for the territory, including researching best practice.

"I think the issue that we're continuing to work on is cross border negotiations with NSW," Mr De'Ath said.

Opposition health spokeswoman Vicki Dunne has previously said the government is unprepared for the split and failed to do due diligence on the shake up.

“A diligent government would have invested a great deal of thought, research and consultation into the decision well before signing off on it,” she said in July.