Subscriber • Opinion

Scott Morrison and Anthony Albanese show two very different forms of masculinity in federal election campaign

By Blair Williams
Updated May 5 2022 - 8:42pm, first published May 2 2022 - 7:30pm
The PM attends the Royal Easter Show in Sydney; and right, Albanese visits Bluesfest at Byron Bay with his partner Jodie Haydon. Pictures: James Croucher, Sitthixay Ditthavong

It's no secret that Australian politics is overwhelmingly masculine. Yet conceptions of political masculine identity have differed based on party lines. Labor prime minister Bob Hawke portrayed himself as an Aussie larrikin, while his predecessor Paul Keating presented a particularly aggressive persona in parliament to establish his authority as a leader. Liberal prime ministers John Howard and Tony Abbott capitalised on the prevailing mood of the post-9/11 era by channeling a strong fatherly protector role that promised to keep Australians safe while tacitly reinforcing feelings of fear and uncertainty.

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